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January 31 2014

Archimedes
00:11
Van Cleef & Arpels has a new line of expensive toys for the astronomically inclined rich...

Heliocentric mockup of an Antikythera wristwatch
... proving a dramatic decline in mechanical engineering skills since antiquity. For the original design of the Antikythera mechanism, see:

Tony Freeth and Alexander Jones: "The Cosmos in the Antikythera Mechanism" ISAW Papers 4, February 2012.

Tony Freeth: "Eclipse Prediction on the Ancient Greek Astronomical Calculating Machine Known as the Antikythera Mechanism", PLOSone, July 30, 2014.
Reposted bycezarfaceastronomygroup1NdyGoleyrermstrzpleplefaulosophMezamewaitingfortheguidemiyo

January 28 2014

Archimedes
14:08
Archimedes
14:07
Archimedes
13:58
Make Yourself Hallucinate (Safely)

How you can safely trick your mind into triggering a visual hallucination, using only math and neuroscience!
(https://medium.com/starts-with-a-bang/3b5d40ae8919)
Tags: arts science
Reposted byRKMrWaspwaitingfortheguideshadowsdanielbohrermihaicontinuumDevahoseannasl420sciencestonerroctobriana

January 27 2014

Archimedes
00:39
5083 3ffe
Regular Heptadecagon Inscribed in a Circle.
(Carl Friedrich Gauss, 1796)
Tags: science
Reposted fromfasel fasel

January 26 2014

Archimedes
15:09

How online gamers are solving science's biggest problems

 
A new generation of online games don't just provide entertainment – they help scientists solve puzzles involving genes, conservation and the universe.
(The Observer, 25 January 2014)
Tags: arts science
Reposted bysciencebesenambassadorofdumblvcksgruby

January 25 2014

Archimedes
00:02

January 24 2014

Archimedes
23:51
Tags: untagged
Reposted fromunbekannt unbekannt
Archimedes
00:55

January 23 2014

Archimedes
21:37
7612 e691 500
Tags: arts science
Reposted by02mydafsoup-01Philosophymorelight
Archimedes
19:59
0007 7d12 500
Einstein's field equations in the movies:

Les Triplettes de Belleville
by Sylvain Chomet, 2003
(http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0286244)
Tags: arts science
Reposted byblackandwhitebynlm blackandwhitebynlm
Archimedes
19:58
1313 242d 500
Tags: science
Reposted byK-PAXtytekNayuthedenimwayoflifepeggy90brown
Archimedes
19:52
Archimedes
18:52
Children see a pod of dolphins, adults see two lovers

Die Liebesbotschaft der Delphine /
Message d'amour des dauphins
by Sandro Del-Prete, 1987
http://www.sandrodelprete.com
Tags: arts science
Reposted byincontrovertible incontrovertible
Archimedes
14:38
Tags: science
Reposted byastronomygroupsciencebluestarmartrolmenphradshadowssofiasmarvelaxsciencepesymistaeglerionPhlogistontildepleplecallmeanythingyouwanttillbakaampileinincontrovertibleTokei-Ihtogingerstorm02mydafsoup-01adremdicojuzuwuzuLee-Flowsky

January 22 2014

Archimedes
18:45

10 Misconceptions about Free Will


by Sabine Hossenfelder (Jan. 2, 2014)
Reposted byPhilosophysciencekaworubesen
Archimedes
18:43

The Free Will Function


by Sabine Hossenfelder (Feb. 3, 2012)


"In my paper I just pointed out that there exist time evolutions that are neither deterministic nor probabilistic, certainly not in practice but also not in principle. Functions that do that for you are just functions physicists don't normally deal with. The functions that we normally use are solutions to differential equations. They can be forward-evolved or they can't and that is exactly the problem. Yet, there are lots of functions which don't fall in this category. These are functions can can be forward evolved, yet you have no way to ever find out how. They are deterministic, yet you cannot determine them.

Take for example a function that spits out one digit of the number π every second, but you don't know when it started or when it will end. You can record as much output from that function as you want, you'll never be able to tell what number you get in the next second: π is a transcendental number; every string that you record, no matter how long, will keep reappearing. If you don't know that the number is π you won't even be able to find out what number the algorithm is producing.

The algorithm is well-defined and it spits out numbers in a non-random fashion that, if you'd know the algorithm, is perfectly determined. But even if somebody monitors all output for an arbitrarily long amount of time to an arbitrarily good precision, it remains impossible to predict what the next output will be. This has nothing to do with chaos, where it's the practical impossibility of measuring to arbitrary precision that spoils predictability: Chaos is still deterministic. The same initial conditions will always give the same result, you just won't be able to know them well enough to tell. Chaos too doesn't allow you to make a choice, it just prevents you from knowing.

But what if you'd make your decisions after a function like the one I described? Then your decisions would not be random, but they wouldn't be determined by the state of the universe at any earlier time either (nor at any later time for that matter). You need to have your function to complete the time evolution, which is why I call it the 'Free Will Function.' "
Reposted by02mydafsoup-01Philosophysciencekaworucheg00
Archimedes
14:16
Broke his foot before it was mainstream: #HipsterArchimedes @madonna
Tags: untagged
Archimedes
11:43
2295 08da 500
t.co
Tags: untagged
Reposted fromgruetze gruetze

January 20 2014

Archimedes
21:04
Play fullscreen
Rosetta calls home 
Tags: science
Reposted fromscience science
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