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Archimedes
23:50
0639 0554
"The moral behavior of ethics professors:
Relationships among self-reported behavior, expressed normative attitude, and directly observed behavior"

by Eric Schwitzgebel (pic.) & Joshua Rust

Philosophical Psychology, Volume 27, Issue 3, 2014, pages 293-327
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09515089.2012.727135

Abstract
Do philosophy professors specializing in ethics behave, on average, any morally better than do other professors? If not, do they at least behave more consistently with their expressed values? These questions have never been systematically studied. We examine the self-reported moral attitudes and moral behavior of 198 ethics professors, 208 non-ethicist philosophers, and 167 professors in departments other than philosophy on eight moral issues: academic society membership, voting, staying in touch with one's mother, vegetarianism, organ and blood donation, responsiveness to student emails, charitable giving, and honesty in responding to survey questionnaires. On some issues, we also had direct behavioral measures that we could compare with the self-reports. Ethicists expressed somewhat more stringent normative attitudes on some issues, such as vegetarianism and charitable donation. However, on no issue did ethicists show unequivocally better behavior than the two comparison groups. Our findings on attitude-behavior consistency were mixed: ethicists showed the strongest relationship between behavior and expressed moral attitude regarding voting but the weakest regarding charitable donation. We discuss implications for several models of the relationship between philosophical reflection and real-world moral behavior.
Reposted byPhilosophywonkomiriaminopaketdeletemeemynniaderdrittestraycat

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